Lectures

Class of 1960 Lecture – Prof. Kazadi wa Mukuna

The Evolution of the Urban Music in the Democratic Republic of the Congo After Mobutu’s Zaire

Prof. Kazadi wa Mukuna, an ethnomusicologist from the Democratic Republic of Congo, is Professor of Ethnomusicology, Coordinator Graduate Studies, and Co-Director of the Center for the Study of World Musics at the Hugh A. Glauser School of Music at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio (USA). Received his Ph.D. in Ethnomusicology from the University of California, Los Angeles and a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of São Paulo in Brazil. Has taught at the Federal University of Maranhão, University of São Paulo, University of Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO) in Brazil; the National University of Zaire, in Lubumbashi, Michigan State University, and Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts. Professor Kazadi is best known for his numerous publications on the traditional music of Africa on the continent and its influence in the musics of the Americas. He has contributed a great deal on the popular music of the Democratic Republic of Congo and the Brazilian cultural study. His publications in these subjects have appeared in various languages and countries. Among his books are Characteristic Criteria in the Vocal Music of the Luba Shankadi Children (Tervuren, Belgium 1972); Contribuição Bantu na Música Popular Brasileira: Perspectivas Etnomusicológicas (São Paulo, Brazil 2000); and The Ox and the Slave (Bumba-meu-Boi): A Satirical Music Drama in Brazil (New York, The Edwin Mellon Press 2003). Among his articles are “Sotaques: Styles and Ethnicity in a Brazilian Folk Drama,” “The Rise of Bumba-meu-Boi in Maranhão: Resilience of African-Brazilian Cultural Identity,” “Creative Practice in African Music: New Perspectives in the Scrutiny of Africanisms in Diaspora,” “Trends in African Urban Music since 1935,” “Abordagem Interdisiplinar em Etnomusicologia,” “The Structure of Bantu Praise Songs in Zaire,” “The Evolution of Urban Music during the 2nd and 3rd Decades (1975-1985) of the Second Republic – Zaire,” “Latin American Music Influences in Zaire,” “L’Évolution de la Musique Urbaine au Zaire Durant les Dix Premières Années de la Deuxième République (1965-1975),” “The Genesis of Urban Music in Zaire,” “The Process of Assimilation of African Musical Elements in Brazil.” His research projects include but are not limited to “A Dictionary of Urban Music and Musicians in the Democratic Republic of Congo,” and “The Evolution of Urban Music in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.”